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Indego Bike Sharing System

This past spring, the city of Philadelphia implemented a new type of public transportation to go along with its SEPTA (Southeastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority) services. In addition to riding the fifth-largest bus, subway and commuter-rail system in the nation, Philadelphia commuters are now able to bike to their destinations with the new Indego bike sharing system.

As part of a combined effort to provide commuters an alternative mode of transportation, the city of Philadelphia, in conjunction with Independence Blue Cross, Bicycle Transit Systems, B-Cycle and Capital One, developed a comprehensive transit network of one-way bike travel. Featuring over 600 self-service bikes and over 60 stations, Indego provides 24-hour access to commuters at an affordable price of $4 per half-hour, for non-Indego bike share members.

Indego Bike SharingThe Mayor’s Office of Transit and Utilities manages the city’s bike share system, while Bicycle Transit Systems, a Philadelphia-based company, operates the infrastructure. Bicycle Transit Systems was founded by some of the nation’s first bike-share start-ups, and currently manages Oklahoma City’s bike share network. They were awarded a contract to launch the Los Angeles Metro's Downtown LA bike share program, beginning in 2016.

Those interested in trying out the new transportation method can either purchase a membership on a 30-day, annual or per-ride basis, and can use the B-cycle app to find a location near him or her. The bikes features include: three speeds, an adjustable seat and front and rear lights that turn on once the rider begins to peddle. According to PlanPhilly.com, the service reached 100,000 trips two months after it opened, and will be increasing its services to 180 stations and 1,800 bikes.

For more information, visit RideIndego.com or call 844-446-3346.

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