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Global Briefs Archive

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Waterborne Drugs

In urban streams, the presence of pharmaceuticals, including painkillers, stimulants, antihistamines and antibiotics, is causing microbial communities to morph and become resistant to drugs.

Helping Hands

An Australian company is using 3-D printers to create hands, arms and feet prosthetics out of recycled plastic and e-waste.

Women Warriors

The first majority-female anti-poaching unit in South Africa is saving rhinos and with it, the moral fabric of communities.

Obsolete Packaging

A British supermarket chain plans to drastically lower its use of plastic packaging in 1,000 of its own-label products.

All That Glitters

Decorative plastic glitter and the microbeads used in scrubs and shower gels pose a threat to fish and oceans, say scientists.

Love Rocks

People are hand-painting stones with uplifting messages and planting them randomly in public spaces.

Temporary Protection

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has decided not to rescind Obama-era environmental protections that restricted the opening of a copper and gold mine in Alaska’s Bristol Bay that would threaten fisheries and other natural resources.

Recycling IQ

Is this item trash, garbage or recyclable? As important as recycling is, it can sometimes be confusing. A short quiz offers answers to help sort out discards.

‘Sink’ Setback

Logging, drought and wildfires may be turning forests in Africa, Asia and Latin America into carbon emitters rather than absorbers.

Clear Gain

Scientists have developed a transparent, luminescent solar concentrator that looks like clear glass that could potentially supply two-fifths of U.S. energy needs.

Distributed Power

Across the U.S., energy users of all sizes are taking control of their power supply and relieving stress from the grid.

Scientists’ Security

To counter U.S. President Donald Trump’s anti-science stance, French President Emmanuel Macron has awarded 18 climate scientists from the U.S. and elsewhere millions of euros to relocate to France to “Make Our Planet Great Again.”

Transforming Plastics

A British company has invented a solar-powered, onsite mini-recycling plant that transforms plastic waste into usable architectural tiles.

Top Polluters

New research shows that a 100 fossil-fuel producers globally are responsible for 71 percent of all global greenhouse gas emissions during the last 30 years.

Chinese Chokepoint

China’s recyclable processors have given notice they will accept only paper waste uncontaminated by garbage, which has become a mountainous problem for many U.S. recycling companies.

Waxworm Wonders

Bacteria found in waxworms can digest plastic in mere weeks or months, far outperforming other plastic decomposition processes requiring 10 to 1,000 years.

We Need Trees

With the loss of 73.4 million acres of tree cover globally in 2016, annual tree-planting programs like Arbor Day in the U.S. and more massive tree-planting programs like those in Brazil, India and New Zealand are sorely needed.

Sway Congress

The Trump Administration’s Fiscal Year 2019 budget again calls on Congress to lift long-standing prohibitions on the destruction and slaughter of wild horses and burros.

Wind Harvest

The first floating wind farm in the UK, Hywind in Scotland, will have a 30-megawatt capacity to provide clean energy to 20,000 homes.

Sickly Salmon

Parasitic sea lice that kill salmon and render them inedible are disrupting salmon farms worldwide, driving up the price of salmon.

Fossilized Financing

The world’s biggest economies provide four times more public financing for fossil fuels than for renewable energies.

Grassroots Gumption

The Sweet Potato Project, a collaborative venture in St. Louis, trains at-risk youth in culinary, business, horticulture and restaurant skills.

Food Sourcing

Efforts are underway to grow the sea microalgae that can produce the nutrients needed to feed a growing global population.

Veggie Renaissance

Motivated by health, animal welfare and environmental concerns, 28 percent of Britons have drastically reduced their meat intake.

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